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Archive for January, 2010

An iv17 Sol 8° Aquarius, Luna 20° Cancer Dies Jovis
Thursday, January 28, 2010 e.v. 5:04 PM

Now its time for an utterly ridiculous blog post.

Right before New Years, going into 2010, me and the boyfriend went down to a local pub. Basic fare, fried food and beer. You know, get in those extra calories before the new years’ resolutions. The ones where you swear not to overeat and drink. Yea, that one. Anyway, since the serving portion was huge, we decided to brown bag it.

Next morning…too lazy to make a proper nutritional breakfast and discovered this:

Interesting huh? Now you’re probably thinking, huh? At a glance it just looks like over-fried food. On the contrary, however. a closer look and this piece of leftover onion ring resembles the infinity symbol. The meaning of this infinity symbol is a mathematical one, (as in the number 8 sideways). Also in mystical terms, representing eternity with the universe. Sort of like the Ouroboro, the serpent devouring its own tail.

Take this tarot card for example. We’ll use the most famous deck of them all, the Rider-Waite deck. Here’s the first card, The Magician:

Look above the magician’s head. He is connecting himself with the universe:

Not satisfied with this, I decided to “magically” play with my food:

Now compare:

I was being silly, of course.
As for the food itself? It was consumed afterwards, except for the Infinity shaped onion ring. It had become inedible hard, so it went in the garbage can. To Will, to dare and to silently go into the trash.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/longterm/books/chap1/mysteryaleph.htm

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Two weekends ago, Steve Serverin performed live at Galapagos Art Space. It wasn’t really a concert per say. Serverin performed a live film score to the 1928 silent film ‘The Seashell and the Clergyman’.

For those not familiar, Steve Serverin is best known for being the bassist for Siouxsie and The Banshees. As a founding member, Serverin was one of the key collaborators with the band during his tenure. During the recent film showing, one could see not only the musical contributions, but also the visual aspects. Choosing Brooklyn’s Galapagos Art Space was well suited, as it slightly added to the atmospheric event.

If you’re interested in the general history of Avant-garde and experimental films, you might want to investigate ‘La Coquille Et Le Clergyman.’ (French title) It’s thought to be one of the first flicks to fall under the ‘Surrealist’ tag. Supposedly quite controversial during its day, with themes of obsession, lust, and brief nudity. French filmmaker Germaine Dulac was not only directed, but she also wrote and produced this silent. Perhaps it might be safe to say she was one of the first directors of the female persuasion. Now if you’re into making it a ‘Blockbuster night’, this probably won’t be for you. However, if you’re into film history, then you might want to investigate.

To round out this brief review, the musical performance was actually more of a backdrop for this silent film. Steve Serverin has succeeded in moving beyond the iconic ghost of Siouxsie. So instead of relying on past glories, Servern instead threw focus into a different composing direction. Me personally, even if I was an extremely big Siouxsie and the Banshees fan, if he was just rehashing old tunes on stage, I would’ve not bothered. I preferred this method much better. So in whole, definitely worth checking out.

http://www.stevenseverin.com/
http://www.galapagosartspace.com/

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Howdy folks!

It’s been a minute since I’ve updated this blog. Not that you’ve been waiting in anticipation or anything like that. A-hem.

Since ‘cult’, ‘midnight’, ‘exploitative’, or ‘grindhouse’ films rock my world, I decided to share my love with you.

Back when MySpace was the number one time waster (three years ago), I used to post a Babalon Babes and Psycho Bunny pic of the week. It was something that I’ve enjoyed a lot. Unfortunately in 2007, thanks to life’s little curve balls, got sidetracked. Tried to start this up again in 2008, but by then everyone and their mother moved over to Facebook. I’m just as guilty, so check out my group on Facebook: facebook comic con/michele witchipoo. Basically MySpace became the Norma Desmond of the internet. Just like in the 1950 flick Sunset Boulevard, she waits patiently for her last closeup.

Speaking of movie madness, I’m going to try something different; a movie trailer of the week.

Here’s a trailer from the year 1973. The same year that brought us Deep Throat, Roe Vs. Wade, An American Family, Dark Side of The Moon, and Watergate. The same year that NYC celebrated the opening of the World Trade Center, and 42nd street grindhouse was in full swing. This film opened in 1973 as well. Perhaps not as historic, but hey. To be perfectly honest, I haven’t seen this film either. My guess is that like others, the trailer is usually more entertaining than the movie itself. Here goes; Cannibal Girls!

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“In my movies, everyone’s in love with Joe Dallesandro.” – Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol ‘Superstar’ and premiere male sex symbols of 60s/70s Underground cinema. With that said, it can be summed up as this; today at age 61, Joe Dallesandro is an iconic living legend.

For those not familiar with Warhol-lore, here’s a quick crash course. Born in Florida, raised rough in NYC. He first supported himself as a teenage prostitute and nude model.

Sometime in 1967 Joe met Andy Warhol and filmmaker Paul Morrissey. Together they cast Dallesandro immediately in “The Loves of Ondine.” The rest is underground cinematic history. His turn as a hustler in 1968’s ‘Flesh’ introduced him to the mainstream as well as the underground.

In addition to being photographed by Francesco Scavullo, Jack Robinson, Richard Avedon, he has graced two famous album covers. One was the Rolling Stones’ ‘Sticky Fingers’ and later on in the early 80s with The Smiths’ self titled debut.

After finishing Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein and Andy Warhol’s Dracula (both 1974) Joe decided to stay in Europe. For the next ten years he acted in a variety of Italian films. During the 1980s, Little Joe and his crude tattoo made his U.S. comeback. The best known of the current wave of roles; Francis Ford Coppla’s ‘The Cotton Club’ and John Waters’ ‘Crybaby.’ During the 1990s, Joe modeled for a Calvin Klein fashion ad. According to Wikipedia, Dallesandro is married for the third time, and currently lives in Los Angles.

If all else, Joe Dallesandro will always be immortalized in the Lou Reed song “Walk On The Wild Side.”

Little Joe never once gave it away
Everybody had to pay and pay
A hustle here and a hustle there
New York City’s the place where they say,
Hey babe, take a walk on the wild side
I said, Hey Joe
Take a walk on the wild side

I just found out that Joe Dallesandro has a documentary about himself making the rounds, titled ‘Little Joe.’ In promotion of that film, here’s a link to a video, Joe being interviewed by onetime club kid (Party Monster/Disco Bloodbath) James St. James:

http://www.dailyfreakshow.tv/episodes/81-james-interviews-joe-dallesandro

Research Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Dallesandro

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Somehow this doesn’t surprise me…someone’s housecat got called up for jury duty. Despite protests, this kitty could actually serve.

Post on Paw Nation; feline jury duty..

However, the cat might more sense that most humans. Just saying.

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The first wave of the Batcave movement, later to be evolved to what is now known as Gothic began in the late 1970s/early 1980s. It’s (hair)roots can be traced to the United Kingdom. Submerging elements of Glam Rock, Psychedelic, Punk/Post-Punk, Alternative Rock, New Wave, and a bit of synthesizer created a genre still popular today. Unfortunately, although the term “Goth” has become overused and mainstreamed, this particular subculture broke off into a variety of other underground sub-genres. Some of the sub-genres listed include Darkwave, Industrial and some Electronica.

Some of the most known bands to emerge from the Goth movement range from Siouxsie and the Banshees, The Cure, Bauhaus, Sisters of Mercy, Joy Division and Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds. There was lesser known groups as well: Specimen, Christian Death, Xmal Deutschland, The Virgin Prunes, Skeletal Family…etc., etc. You could go in the direction of Alien Sex Fiend, or you entrance yourself in the ethereal/4AD sounds of such bands like Cocteau Twins, Dead Can Dance and This Mortal Coil. Newer bands from the 1990s and 2000s include Bella Morte, and London After Midnight. Some of the older bands later shed the Goth label, finding commercial success. Others remained underground with small cult followings, most fading into obscurity.

The Danse Society was such a band with the misfortune of later obscurity.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Danse_Society

I remember Danse Society fondly. Suppose it was due to the fact that it brings nice memories of being a teen. I was just starting to learn about Alternative music. Plus the lead vocalist (Steve Rawlings) was easy on the eyes. There was a single this band had released titled “Say It Again.” Despite a more peppier sound than their earlier tunes, it was still a good song.

Considering that iTunes has some early Deathrock ditties like “Sex Beat” available, you would think “Say It Again” would be as well. No such luck. In fact, iTunes has two albums for purchase: the 1986 album “Looking Through” and the 2001 compilation “Seduction.” However missing was the later single “Say It Again.” Sigh….somehow this is typical of iTunes.

So once again we turn to that modern phenomenon called YouTube. This was the best copy of the promotional video I could find:

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Yesterday claymation/animator Art Clokey died. I loved Clokey’s shows; even Davey and Goliath.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/herocomplex/2010/01/art-clokey-the-creator-of-the-whimsical-clay-figure-gumby-died-in-his-sleep-friday-at-his-home-in-los-osos-calif-after-b.html

Immediately after hearing the news, I thought about the Eddie Murphy skit from Saturday Night Live. The one where Murphy played a bitter cigar chomping character…”I’m Gumby dammit!” So of course I hit YouTube for clip, but no avail. So I found this:

After Art and Ruth Clokey found success with Gumby, the Lutheran Church in America came a-calling. Somehow this religious organization had $1 million to fund Christian propaganda aimed at America’s youth. Each episode had Davey and his talking dog Goliath involved in a series of dilemmas. However, as long as these two put their faith in God, a happy ending would be bestowed upon them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davey_and_Goliath

Still it would be strange that such a nice Christian boy wouldn’t question on how or why his pet dog had the ability to talk. Davey wasn’t the only one with a talking dog. Didn’t David Berkowitz have the same problem? Supposedly serial killer Son of Sam dealt with a similar situation. Someone should introduce these two; imagine the conversations they would have together, about canines, mass media and the bible. (Berkowitz became a born-again Christian after he was incarcerated.) Check that Moral Orel!

Seriously though…despite the Christian overtones, it managed to be entertaining without prophesizing too much. I remember fondly watching reruns on syndication during my wee kiddie years on a local NYC television station. Within the past ten years I’ve even considered getting Davey and Goliath action figures. Quite sure these collector items would make a great addition to my home.

So before this post ends, I will leave you with the original opening credits to the Gumby show:

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